‘After Dark’: a great time to visit SEA LIFE London Aquarium

Brilliant time tonight at one of SEA LIFE London Aquarium’s ‘After Dark’ events. Here we are with Phoenix the sea turtle, who as you can see was more than happy to pose for photos with us. Phoenix is a curvy girl, weighing in at 23 stones, and at the youthful age of 17 has another … Continue reading ‘After Dark’: a great time to visit SEA LIFE London Aquarium

A fascinating insight into Beatrix Potter’s London: the city she once hated, but grew to cherish

I came away from the Victoria & Albert Museum feeling very moved by its 'Beatrix Potter’s London' exhibition, which explores the role of London, Beatrix’s “unloved birth place”, in her life and work. Thanks to this exhibition – which marks the 150th anniversary of Beatrix’s birth - I also felt that I had come to … Continue reading A fascinating insight into Beatrix Potter’s London: the city she once hated, but grew to cherish

‘Undermined’: a tale of one man, one chair – and a pint of bitter

One man, one chair – and a pint of bitter. Three elements which come together, seamlessly, to form the compelling slice of theatre which is ‘Undermined’. Danny Mellor (who also wrote this play) is Dale, a 20-something miner content in the life he shares with his fiancée in the close-knit South Yorkshire community in which … Continue reading ‘Undermined’: a tale of one man, one chair – and a pint of bitter

Pocahontas in London: at last, the truth behind THAT famous visit

Today marks the 400th anniversary of the funeral of Rebecca Rolfe – known to most of us as Pocahontas. So many books and films (not to mentions ballets and plays) have been made about Pocahontas that it can be difficult to distinguish fact from fiction – and one of the reasons I enjoyed this London … Continue reading Pocahontas in London: at last, the truth behind THAT famous visit

How ‘Larkinworld’ introduces a side to Philip Larkin that we may never even have known existed

With my spine still tingling from Melissa James’ electrifying performance, I took advantage of being in the Royal Festival Hall to travel to the top of the building and visit The Poetry Library, which is currently hosting ‘Larkinworld’ – artist DJ Roberts’ exhibition dedicated to the renowned poet. An interesting man, Philip Larkin. If you … Continue reading How ‘Larkinworld’ introduces a side to Philip Larkin that we may never even have known existed

From Adland to Hollywood: Sir Alan Parker’s journey from the world of advertising to international box office success

Privileged tonight to watch the film director Sir Alan Parker being interviewed by Sam Delaney, at the final event of IPA’s ‘100 Years of British Advertising’ festival. Not a lot of people know this, but advertising is where it all began for Sir Alan, who counts ‘Midnight Express’, ‘Fame’ and ‘Mississipi Burning’ among his many … Continue reading From Adland to Hollywood: Sir Alan Parker’s journey from the world of advertising to international box office success

‘An Elegant Madness’: Beau Brummell, and a morality tale for our times

The year is 1819, the location is Calais - and Beau Brummell is in exile, having left England bankrupt and having fallen out with his former friend & patron, the Prince Regent. If you aren't familiar with the character of Beau Brummell, he really did exist, as do a number of stories and anecdotes about … Continue reading ‘An Elegant Madness’: Beau Brummell, and a morality tale for our times

Watching Arthur Miller’s ‘The Crucible’ and wondering: will we never learn?

No matter how many times I see it performed, I never tire of watching ‘The Crucible’ - whether in its stage format or on a cinema screen. Arguably, its themes have never been more relevant – Arthur Miller’s play may have been written in 1953 and concern events which occurred in the 17th century (albeit … Continue reading Watching Arthur Miller’s ‘The Crucible’ and wondering: will we never learn?