Murder, mayhem and an unexpected brush with fashion royalty: how the City of London Police Museum is full of surprises

The City of London Police has been responsible for policing London’s famous Square Mile since 1839. The smallest police district in the world, it also has its very Museum – the subject of this post. I’ll be honest: when a friend recommended the Museum to me, I couldn’t see the attraction. Could not, to be … Continue reading Murder, mayhem and an unexpected brush with fashion royalty: how the City of London Police Museum is full of surprises

Lunch at the UK’s first organic gastropub turns out to be an experience second to none

“Bit of a mouthful, isn’t it?” commented my friend. Luckily, Claire wasn’t referring to the delicious food which at that very moment we were tucking into, but to the name of the establishment in which we found ourselves upon this sunny Saturday. And she was right: 'Riverford at the Duke of Cambridge' doesn’t exactly roll … Continue reading Lunch at the UK’s first organic gastropub turns out to be an experience second to none

Harriet Harman on women in politics – and why she believes Jeremy Corbyn will be the next Prime Minister

It was quite an entrance that Harriet Harman made, wine glass in hand, at The Politics Festival 2017: “Jo Brand once told me that you should always be more drunk than your audience”, she teased us. ‘Mother of the House’ – i.e. the longest-serving female MP in Parliament – Harriet was at the Festival to … Continue reading Harriet Harman on women in politics – and why she believes Jeremy Corbyn will be the next Prime Minister

Love, laughter and some killer stilettos at ‘Kinky Boots’

There’s nothing I enjoy more than a night out at one of London’s West End theatres – all that glamour, entwined with so much history – but I must confess to a moment of trepidation whilst on the way to see ‘Kinky Boots’, at the Adelphi. The last West End musical I went to was … Continue reading Love, laughter and some killer stilettos at ‘Kinky Boots’

‘Where shall she live?’ The choices and challenges faced by the independent Edwardian woman in London – and some surprising answers

Those of us lucky enough to live in London today take so much for granted. Not least, the right to live where we want, with whom we want – and for our gender to play no part in that decision. Tonight, as part of the London Festival of Architecture, I attended a fascinating talk by … Continue reading ‘Where shall she live?’ The choices and challenges faced by the independent Edwardian woman in London – and some surprising answers

A fresh, young talent in gracious, old surroundings: Kandace Springs at Shoreditch Town Hall

I couldn’t have asked for a better setting in which to which to watch up & coming singer/song-writer Kandace Springs than the atmospheric surroundings of Shoreditch Town Hall. This is one of my favourite buildings in London: if you aren’t familiar with it, the Town Hall stands proudly upon the site of the old Fuller’s … Continue reading A fresh, young talent in gracious, old surroundings: Kandace Springs at Shoreditch Town Hall

9 reasons why you really should visit Leicester Square — by ‘Westminster Walks’

Shock horror – yes, I am really suggesting that you should visit Leicester Square as on the periphery of the square can be found some amazingly cheap places to go for food, for entertainment but also for peace and tranquility. Although the China Exchange is within an enormous building that straddles both Lisle Street and Gerrard… … Continue reading 9 reasons why you really should visit Leicester Square — by ‘Westminster Walks’

I finally get my day in court – at where else than the Royal Courts of Justice?

The Royal Courts of Justice is one of those buildings in London that I’ve walked past many times, admiring its beauty, but have never expected to be able to visit (that is, unless I was to commit a particularly heinous crime, an idea which lacks appeal). So, when I found out that the London Historians … Continue reading I finally get my day in court – at where else than the Royal Courts of Justice?

At home with the Freuds: an inspiring afternoon exploring the Hampstead residence of the father of psychoanalysis

The first thing that struck me upon entering The Freud Museum was how much it still feels like a family home, even though it has not been used as one for several decades. I was at the London house of Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, and his family; latterly owned by his youngest daughter, … Continue reading At home with the Freuds: an inspiring afternoon exploring the Hampstead residence of the father of psychoanalysis